Summary of our Social Media experience

March 9, 2011

 

Working for our social media blog was indeed a great fun as well as a valuable experience. From the very beginning the process from research to presentation all aspects of social media blog was very interesting. It was a great example of mutual coordination and cooperation among the group members. It also provided us with an opportunity to share our views and experiences not only among the group members but the response and comments received on our posts. The real feedback on our blog from our friends, colleagues and fellow students is indeed a great learning on our part. Collective presentation of our research was also really of great worth.  Overall it was a wonderful experience which should help us in our professional journalistic life.

Iqbal Yousafzai

 

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Twitter talk reflections and explanations

March 2, 2011

As part of our presentation, we had a twitter talk with some very helpful journalists and PR professionals: Rory Cellan-Jones, Adam Westbrook, Katy Creates and Jonathan Morris.

Now, as you will see from the twitter conversation itself, their pearls of wisdom gave us a lot to think about. I also think the exercise demonstrated brilliantly the power of social media for making connections on journalism.

Prior to the morning of the presentation, our group had been trying to organise a bunch of people to converse via Twitter at a set time. Becs had success with Katy, who agreed to join us. But the people I had in mind to involve were proving much harder to pin down. So, what did we do? We twitter monitored!

By watching the live twitter feed, we are able to see which of the people we were following were online at the same time we were. Now, perhaps this was a double stroke of luck (I’m happy at this point in time to attribute it to the power of social media), but monitoring through the morning saw a variety of journalists were online – and in my personal opinion (and rather jammily (I don’t think that’s a word, but I’m going to go with it)), some of the best people to talk about social media.

After a quick @mention, Rory, Adam, Jonathan and Katy were kind enough to respond and agree to join in our conversation.

Now, I really didn’t expect this to happen. I thought I’d give it a go and get no response. ut no, social media strikes again and allowed us to get in contact with people I’m unlikely to ever meet face to face.

Do you think I would have got the same response if I’d emailed them? Or given them a call (if somehow I was able to find their numbers…)? I don’t think I would have.

Social Media is breaking down all sorts of boundaries and opening up the world of communication to all who are willing to use it. Imagine the contacts database you could try to build? It would take some work and willingness, but what a tool.


Social Media and a glimpse of history

February 10, 2011

 


The real deal: social media at work

January 29, 2011

BBC journalist Rory Cellan-Jones describes how social media has changed the way in which he works…

Follow him on Twitter: @ruskin147


Business networking – an editors perspective

January 29, 2011

Tim Weber, Business editor for BBC News website discusses how social media and new technology has changed the way we work, live and make money…

Davos 2011: We’re all hyper-connected, now what?


Neanderthal to New Media

January 27, 2011

Since the dawn of the human race conversations have successfully passed information from one person to another (even though cavemen spoke in grunts I’m sure they still managed to decide on which part of the carcass they’d prefer to eat for dinner!). This is news.

Fast forward a couple of thousand years to the 20th Century – language has developed and the industrial revolution has kicked in. The modern world has well and truly got going.

It was an important century, and marked the start of a progressive global shift away from words and the printed press for the transmission of information and knowledge.

Whilst face-to-face conversations still dominated, people were becoming increasingly able to communicate with people further away than their garden fence.

It’s not just language that was revolutionised. Images now play a central role in news broadcasting and citizen journalism.

Whilst it’s not the most beautiful of timelines, here’s a pretty comprehensive history of communications, starting with Kodak Brownies invention in 1900 that made photography cheaper and simpler. What a man.


Keeping with the beat

January 27, 2011

The way in which news is sourced has changed significantly over the last decade. The typical image of a reporter with a hat, trench coat and cigar is no longer synonymous with the trade…

Back in the day, when newspapers ruled, reporters were counted on to get out and about on their beat and acquire first hand reports of what was going on in their area. With the explosion of new media in general, there are now less hours dedicated to this type of work and more to the use of social media to source stories and the production of multi-platform content. 

The traditional methods of news gathering:

Beat system, stringer system, whistleblowers, press releases, forward planning.

All pretty simple and tried and tested methods of finding news – especially locally.

Whilst these methods do remain for broadcasters and print journalists (particularly whistleblowers and press releases), they are increasingly less likely to need to get out of the newsroom to source material…I guess why get cold when you can do it via the web?

Not only is it economically viable, but (provided publishers are on the pulse flagging stories) by using social media a journalist can hit a stories within minutes of it happening.

This does mean however that news groups lose their face in the community – the person to contact and trust with their information.

Is this a problem for the future? Or does is simply tie in with the increasingly personal world we all live in, the loss of the sense of community in an area and the rapid development of communication?

Something to think about.