Ethics and editorial guidelines (II)

February 9, 2011

 

 

Daisy Griffith, social media strategy and digital content for BBC and others, talking about new ethical guidelines for journalists.

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How journalists use social network

February 8, 2011

Journalists are, by nature, crafty folk who are wonderfully adept at stalking — I mean, finding sources and relevant information for various and sundry stories. Well, the advent of social media has made the process of reporting all the more nuanced, and has served as a vital channel for everything from finding leads to contacting sources to sharing and furthering one’s brand.

Still, as the Internet continues to expand, it can be difficult to pick and choose which tools are right for journalists — it can be daunting to litter one’s desktop with Twitter applications, social networks, location-based tools and blogs.

Tools such as Face book and Twitter serve as excellent filters for the masses of information circulating on the web. Although many journalists swear by Twitter as a method of spotting and filtering out trends, Face book can also function as a vital reporting tool.

Journalists gather lot of information through these social networking sites. Much of the news would not have been possible even without these social sites.


What is modern Journalism?

February 3, 2011

One thing at present time is clear: whilst blogging and journalism fall within the same sphere of information transfer, factors such as authenticity and context differentiate the two. Bloggers do not pose a direct threat to the journalism profession; they simply add another facet of competition to the work of contemporary journalists. But those who wish to be successful in online publishing need to develop skills which relate directly to the online context as well as those which apply to the journalism profession in general.


Effects of Social Media on Journalists

February 1, 2011

The technological changes have opened great opportunities for journalists across the world to connect with the public on an unprecedented level. The rise of social media has changed the way how a story is communicated and consumed. As most of the news men make a great deal of social media for interaction with readers and sources both. Similarly, by using the new tools journalists can also get instant feedback as well as develop valuable relationships with the public at large.


The real deal: social media at work

January 29, 2011

BBC journalist Rory Cellan-Jones describes how social media has changed the way in which he works…

Follow him on Twitter: @ruskin147


Keeping with the beat

January 27, 2011

The way in which news is sourced has changed significantly over the last decade. The typical image of a reporter with a hat, trench coat and cigar is no longer synonymous with the trade…

Back in the day, when newspapers ruled, reporters were counted on to get out and about on their beat and acquire first hand reports of what was going on in their area. With the explosion of new media in general, there are now less hours dedicated to this type of work and more to the use of social media to source stories and the production of multi-platform content. 

The traditional methods of news gathering:

Beat system, stringer system, whistleblowers, press releases, forward planning.

All pretty simple and tried and tested methods of finding news – especially locally.

Whilst these methods do remain for broadcasters and print journalists (particularly whistleblowers and press releases), they are increasingly less likely to need to get out of the newsroom to source material…I guess why get cold when you can do it via the web?

Not only is it economically viable, but (provided publishers are on the pulse flagging stories) by using social media a journalist can hit a stories within minutes of it happening.

This does mean however that news groups lose their face in the community – the person to contact and trust with their information.

Is this a problem for the future? Or does is simply tie in with the increasingly personal world we all live in, the loss of the sense of community in an area and the rapid development of communication?

Something to think about.