Social media outlets – now and the future

By means of research for this blog, it is safe to say that social media is increasingly being adopted throughout the media industry and will continue to do so. 

When watching the news, the presenters now ask us to tweet our thoughts and opinions to their twitter accounts; when listening to the radio, we are invited to do the same and write comments on their facebook page ; newspapers now have their own social media correspondents like the Guardian’s ‘Networker,’ or in the ‘I’ newspaper, they have a section dedicated to readers tweets and a ‘blogosphere,’ where they have taken sections from some of their readers’ blogs. Furthermore, charities are using social media to spread their news fast and efficiently and to connect with the public and the interested community. Social media even makes news. The most recent news in the UK is that Twitter can be used by journalists in the courts.

Who knows about the future of social media? It is developing fast in the world of news and is constantly being used in different and new ways. Maybe, soon, these programmes will be in 3D, or we will start seeing holograms of people commenting live on TV news programmes through a new social media application… watch this space.

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7 Responses to Social media outlets – now and the future

  1. Adrian Naik says:

    By getting audience reaction via social media, the news organisations can claim to be more in touch with their audience.

    I think more research should be done into the people who respond to these. Some people are far more likely to respond than others; the more outspoken people will have something to say. Unfortunately these people often have very extreme views.

    Perhaps the news organisations should take care with these responses, as they may not represent the views of their audience accurately.

  2. I agree with Adrian. Social media’s infiltration into mainstream news is happening. What isn’t happening is an assessment of what sections of the audience are using it and what impact that will eventually have.

    Wasn’t it Andrew Marr who told us that all bloggers are geeky, spotty, pale loosers? What if all people who get involved via social media are the same? Doesn’t social media feedback risk alienating whole sections of an audience?
    What will happen to output if it’s only gaining input from spotty teenagers strapped to their computers?

    This might be overly dramatic, but I think there’s quite a large section of society that are worried about being left out of the most cutting edge conversations, news and debate, because they don’t use social media to an extent that the younger generations do.

  3. Anne Gonschorek says:

    Although I agree with both of you, I have a feeling that this is exactly how the media system of attracting attention works.

    I mean, if you look at our headlines, we’re either setting the REALLY bad news on top or the REALLY good ones. -Earthquake? If not at least half the town has been destroyed and a couple of people have been killed, we don’t even bother to put it up on the chart.

    I think same goes for the comments. I know that the BBC e.g. tries to be as balanced as possible, but what really sparks the audience’s attention, are those sometimes rather “extreme” statements.

  4. I also agree with you Adrian. Yes, news organisations can claim that they are satisfying their active audience by announcing/using their comments, but who is actually saying them? Their target audience could be completely out of the age bracket of those who are commenting via means of social media. This in turn could therefore not be a true representation of their real watchers or listeners. More research should be done into this.

    I too agree with you Anne, what people are interested in are the extreme statements to spark a lively and sometimes controversial debate.

  5. News in 3D or a holograms of newsreaders, scary thought…

    Jess’s comment, “Wasn’t it Andrew Marr who told us that all bloggers are geeky, spotty, pale loosers? What if all people who get involved via social media are the same? Doesn’t social media feedback risk alienating whole sections of an audience?
    What will happen to output if it’s only gaining input from spotty teenagers strapped to their computers?”

    Again a scary thought…

    I guess only time will tell if journalism keeps it’s credibility throught this digital age. I only hope that people will see sense and not allow this to happen….maybe that will be our jobs to ensure this. Or perhaps we are the spotty, geeky, losers that Andrew Marr is talking about. I have faith that Twitter will not completely drown the air-waves and that good old-fashioned journalism will win through in the end.

  6. Claire Jones says:

    Absolutely Lucy. Don’t get me wrong, I think the internet is fantastic and Twitter is a great means of communication. But I too hope that good old-fashioned journalism will win through and journalists will continue to investigate and report news, events and trends from their own newsgathering abilities. It’s going to be a sorry time for journalism in this country if we sit in front of Twitter all day waiting for a 140 character tweet to know that something is going on!

  7. I definitely agree there Claire! I think that this hit home in Abs’ video during the amazing introduction video which the Public service broadcasting team created for their presentation.

    However, I don’t think that the future of social media in news broadcasting is about anyone winning or loosing, more about a joining of the two. I too hope there will always be a place for the ten ‘o’ clock news. But I think that as internet technology becomes more widely accessible to all generations (and undoubtably it will because of the amount of time school children now spend using the internet) we could see a broader audience wanting to communicate with the news via mediums like twitter, facebook, and whichever social media craze comes along next!

    When I asked people about impartiality in news broadcasting, many thought that a broader input from the public would make news more relevent. What better way than via social media?

    http://impartialityucf.wordpress.com/2011/03/09/impartiality-over-to-you/

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